"Here are women who sing about sex. Sexuality. Contemporary womanhood. Wholeness. Arrival. […] The record dismantles the idea that marriage, commitment, or monogamy ruins one’s sex life. It challenges the notion that a woman’s life should be lead in complete service to her child. This album is widely successful because it makes women feel good about themselves. I can see how that might be confusing for some […] Detractors decried the album’s explicit content in typical "Won’t someone think of the children?" form, seemingly forgetting that the singer is 32 and under no obligation to parent any child but her own. BEYONCÉ introduces Knowles as a sexual being, not a being sexualized by industry. She communicates her proclivities in her own certain terms. And yes, that may sometimes involve a duration on her knees. No, you may not watch." - From Janet To Beyoncé: Why It Matters When Black Women Sing About Sexuality 

(Source: beyoncexknowles, via fuckyesbeyonce)

"Do you think that your 16 year old daughter hasn’t masturbated already? Like, do you really think there’s anything in that scene that this chick hasn’t already tried when the lights go out at night, or in the bathroom, or in the tub, or with the shower head or something like that? I’m telling you, man, I’m not teaching this broad anything new. If I were to create a rating system, I wouldn’t even put murder right at the top of the chief offenses. I would put rape right at the top, and assault against women. Because it’s so insanely overused and insulting how much it’s overused in movies as a plot device, a woman in peril. That, to me, is offensive, yet that shit skates."
- Kevin Smith (director) on the ridiculousness of movies about sex receiving NC-17 ratings while extremely violent movies get by with R ratings. (via kevinnj)

(via justpeachyxo)